Engineering

We love the web, and care deeply about beautiful code, APIs, and documentation. This belief is as true today as it was when we first wrote this line on our website when we were ten people. Our engineering blog captures how, what, and why we code at Stripe.

Engineering

A primer on machine learning for fraud detection

Michael Manapat Engineering

Stripe Radar is a collection of tools to help businesses detect and prevent fraud. At Radar’s core is a machine learning engine that scans every card payment across Stripe’s 100,000+ businesses, aggregates information from those payments into behavioral signals that are predictive of fraud, and blocks payments that have a high probability of being fraudulent. Here's how we use machine learning to detect and prevent fraud.

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Engineering

Introducing Veneur: high performance and global aggregation for Datadog

Cory Watson Reliability

When a company writes about their observability stack, they often focus on sweet visualizations, advanced anomaly detection or innovative data stores. Those are well and good, but today we’d like to talk about the tip of the spear when it comes to observing your systems: metrics pipelines! Metrics pipelines are how we get metrics from where they happen—our hosts and services—to storage quickly and efficiently so they can be queried, all without interrupting the host service.

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Engineering

Open-Source Retreat 2016 grantees

Michelle Bu Payments

Like many developers, we often contribute to open-source software in bits and pieces over long periods of time. So we started the Open-Source Retreat to help open-source developers make concentrated progress on features and releases with the potential for significant impact. For 2016’s Retreat, we’re inviting three developers to work on their projects from Stripe’s office in SF.

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Engineering

Open-Source Retreat 2016

Kyle Conroy Engineering

We increasingly rely on (and contribute back to!) a lot of open-source software to build Stripe, and we’d like to give back and get more people working on open-source.

Last year, we invited four developers to the Stripe office as part of our first Open-Source Retreat. Our grantees made significant progress on their projects in a relatively short time. Starting January, we’re hosting another Open-Source Retreat at Stripe.

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Engineering

Libscore

Greg Brockman Engineering

When we announced the Open Source retreat, we’d pictured it primarily as giving people the opportunity to work on projects they’d already been meaning to do. However, the environment we provided also became a place for people to come up with new ideas and give them a try. One of these ideas, Libscore, is launching publicly today.

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Engineering

Game Day Exercises at Stripe: Learning from `kill -9`

We’ve started running game day exercises at Stripe. During a recent game day, we tested failing over a Redis cluster by running kill -9 on its primary node, and ended up losing all data in the cluster. We were very surprised by this, but grateful to have found the problem in testing. This result and others from this exercise convinced us that game days like these are quite valuable, and we would highly recommend them for others.

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Engineering

Open-Source Retreat grantees

Greg Brockman Engineering

A month ago, we announced our Open-Source Retreat, where we'll be giving grants to a few open-source developers to work on their projects full-time. We were hoping to find projects where our grant could make a large difference: rapidly-growing projects where the maintainer can't currently find the time to give it the attention it needs, risky ideas that have a lot of upside but need support to be tried at all, and the like.

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Engineering

CTF3 architecture

Greg Brockman Engineering

In philosophy, CTF3 was the same as our previous CTFs: we gave people a chance to solve problems they normally would only get to read about. However, in terms of infrastructure, this was by far our most complex CTF: we needed to build, run, and test arbitrary distributed systems code. In the course of the week it was live, our 7,500 participants pushed over 640,000 times, meaning we needed a scalable and robust architecture that provided isolation between users.

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Engineering

Stripe CTF3: Distributed Systems

Greg Brockman Engineering

We’ve found that the best way to teach people to build good systems is by giving them hands-on experience with problems that even expert developers may only occasionally get the chance to solve. We’ve run two previous Capture the Flags, both of which were designed to be an interesting way to get hands-on experience with crafting vulnerabilities.

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