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UI components for iOS

Jack Flintermann on June 30, 2016

We’ve added reusable UI components in our latest iOS SDK that make it easy to accept both Apple Pay and regular credit card payments through a single, unified integration. The UI library supports automatically detecting Apple Pay, storing cards for future use, and custom styling. We hope these pre-built components drastically reduce the time needed to create beautiful, high-conversion iOS checkout flows.

We’ve introduced a new class called STPPaymentContext that is designed to make building your app’s checkout flow as easy as possible—and without having to code it from scratch. To start, some of the pre-built components include:

  • Adding cards: Make it easy for your customers to save card details in your app to use for future purchases. We’ll also handle tokenizing the card info so that sensitive data never hits your servers.
  • Editing cards: Smarter Saved Cards will keep most card details up-to-date automatically, even if they expire or change. You can also let customers manually edit their card info within your app.
  • Billing info: Use our pre-built, native forms to collect addresses from customers.
  • Apple Pay detection: The SDK now configures your app to automatically fall back to a native flow if Apple Pay isn’t supported on the customer’s device. (Previously, you had to manually check for Apple Pay support before presenting either flow.)

These UI components have already been crafted to fit into most apps’ look and feel on iOS devices. Additionally, you can customize the font, as well as background, foreground, and tint colors to match your app’s unique design and make the experience as seamless as possible for customers.

We’ve learned from thousands of the most innovative apps on Stripe—Lyft, Kickstarter, Instacart, OpenTable, and more—to build best practices into these UI components. We’ll also be adding more flows and optimizing the ones launched today over time.

If you’re interested in using these new components, we’ve put together a guide to getting started, which also includes instructions on upgrading to the latest version of the SDK.

As always, if you have questions or feedback, please let me know!